Authors

Annette Sandoval Annette Sandoval

Annette Sandoval

Annette Sandoval

Annette Sandoval’s writing is tightly bound to her experience as a Mexican-American. The youngest of five children, she began life in the barrio neighborhoods of Santa Ana, California. Wanting one of her children to have an “American” name, Annette‘s mother named her after a Mouseketeer. Annette worked at Disneyland while in her teens. She was forced to wear a paper hat and a name tag. When people asked if Annette Funichello was her mother, she would say, “Yes.”

Her parents were both born in the Mexican state of Jalisco. Her father, Manuel, worked as a migrant worker and later as a janitor at a convent, where he was sponsored for green card status. After securing work and papers he sent for his fifteen-year-old bride, Felicitas.

At 21, Annette moved to San Francisco. She spent the next decade backpacking around the world, touring nearly every continent on her own.

She is the author of The Directory of Saints (Dutton/Penguin), which appeared in hardback in 1996. Her second book, Homegrown Healing: Traditional Home Remedies from Mexico (Putnam/Berkely), published in 1998, is one of the first modern works preserving this rich oral tradition. Her novel, Spitfire (Thomas & Mercer) 2012, is about an office drone who suspects her boss of being a serial killer. If that’s not scary enough, he’s got a crush on her! Her fourth child is named, Women Are Like Chickens: All Breast, Thighs and Eggs.

Annette lives in Newport, Rhode Island with Pip and their two rescue dogs.

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Guy Kuttner Guy Kuttner

Guy Kuttner

Guy Kuttner

The late Guy Kuttner (1946-2011, Harvard ’67) was the recipient/victim of a dreary public school education. Guy shared his humanity, insight, irreverence and wit in his story “Always” in HSE’s Above Ground and through his writings on school reform, social justice, politics and the people he knew. He wrote books, columns and powerful letters to the editor. A lifelong peacemaker and war resister, he turned in his draft card with a poem to J. Edgar Hoover and worked whole-heartedly with the War Resisters League, War Tax Resistance Movement, Humboldt Draft Coordinating Committee, Humboldt Sanctuary Movement and Humboldt Committee for Conscientious Objectors, establishing the GI Rights Hotline.

As the Ironies of Fate decreed, he moved from his native Chicago to became a public school teacher in a small college town in Northern California. In his unflagging attempt to introduce humanity and environmental wonder into the curricula, he butted heads, crossed swords, and mixed metaphors with one implacable administration after another. After twenty years, he migrated to a small community college nestled in the redwoods, where he happily taught Academic Literacy. He worked as an education columnist for the local paper and was the author of Tales of the Dolly Llama (Outskirts Press, 2007), a series of vignettes from the classroom liberally intermingled with educational polemic. His last book is entitled More Tales. Guy co-founded the Lost Coast Writers Retreat. He was the proud father of three, grandfather of two, and was married to a saint.

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Abda Khan Abda Khan

Abda Khan

Abda Khan

In 2017, the Iranian and Kurdish Women’s Rights Organisation named Abda Khan a ‘True Honour Award’ Honouree for her work, including Stained (HSE 2016), her debut novel. She has also been shortlisted for the Asian Women of Acheivement Award 2017. Born to Pakistani immigrant parents, Abda Khan was the first child in her family to go on to higher education. She is a lawyer with her own practice.

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Kyla Bennett Kyla Bennett

Kyla Bennett

Kyla Bennett

After receiving a PhD in Ecology from the University of Connecticut, Kyla Bennett attended Lewis and Clark’s Northwestern School of Law, where she obtained a J.D. with a certificate in Natural Resources and Environmental Law. Kyla returned to the east coast in 1989, when she began work at the Boston office of the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency doing wetlands permitting and enforcement. She soon became EPA’s Wetlands Enforcement Coordinator for New England, and stayed in that position until she left EPA in 1999. Kyla then worked as the Deputy Director of Habitat for the International Fund for Animal Welfare (IFAW), headquartered on Cape Cod. After two years of protecting wildlife and their habitats around the world, Kyla joined Public Employees for Environmental Responsibility (PEER). Today, Kyla is the Director of New England PEER, working to protect local, state and federal employees who protect the environment.

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Sean Elder Sean Elder

Sean Elder

Sean Elder

Sean Elder is a freelance writer and editor based in Brooklyn, New York; Salisbury, CT; and Palo Alto, CA. His short story ‘The Vale of Cashmere’ was first published in Harvard Square Edition’s anthology Voice from the Planet. His writing has appeared in the New York Times Magazine, Details, Vogue, Elle, New York, Men’s Journal, National Geographic, Premiere, Gourmet, Food & Wine, Redbook, Glamour and numerous other publications. He was also an editor at a few of those places and still works on print magazines and digital publications. A piece he wrote for O: The Oprah Magazine about being a stay-at-home dad was included in a best-of O collection entitled Live Your Best Life that was published in 2005.

Sean Elder wrote a media column for Salon and before that reviewed web sites for the New Yorker (“Only Connect”). His essay “The Lock Box” was included in a collection of men’s writing, The Bastard on the Couch (Morrow, 2004), and was later reprinted on three continents. He co-authored a book with former Marine Captain Josh Rushing of Control Room fame, entitled Mission Al Jazeera, which was published by Palgrave in 2007. He also works as a book doctor and edited Making the Rounds with Oscar: The Extraordinary Gift of an Ordinary Cat by Dr. David Dosa (Hyperion, 2010), a New York Times bestseller. He has taught writing at Eugene Lang College, part of Manhattan’s New School University, and is am now working on another non-fiction book, with Amos Kamil: Great Is the Truth: The Horace Mann Sex Scandal and the Quest for Justice at the Horace Mann School. He blogs for the boomer website Purple Clover, and a short film based on his short story “Stain Removal” was filmed by director Mark Russell in 2013.

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Fidelis O. Mkparu Fidelis O. Mkparu

Fidelis O. Mkparu

Fidelis O. Mkparu

Fidelis O. Mkparu is an award-winning author born in Onitsha, Nigeria. He was a recipient of Reader’s Digest Scholarship and is the author of Love’s Affliction, winner of a Nautilus Award and a Reviewer’s Choice Award, and IndieFab Book of the Year Finalist, and of Tears Before Exaltation. A Harvard-trained cardiologist, he has published peer-reviewed scientific papers and review articles in major journals, and written articles for lay people on medical issues. He was inducted into Paul Dudley White Honor Society by Massachusetts General Hospital, Harvard Medical School, where he was a Spaulding fellow. He lives in Canton, Ohio. Web site: http://fidelismkparu.com

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Stu Krieger Stu Krieger

Stu Krieger

Stu Krieger

Among his more than 25 produced credits, Stu Krieger wrote the animated classic The Land Before Time for producers Steven Spielberg & George Lucas. The 2017 Riverside International Film Festival is presenting Stu Krieger with its Lifetime Achievement Award in Screenwriting at their opening night gala on April 21, 2017. Stu Krieger’s first novel, That One Cigarette, a story of ordinary people making extraordinary ripples in the ocean of life, will be published by Harvard Square Editions in the fall of 2017.

Stu Krieger is a professor of screen and television writing in the University of California Riverside’s Department of Theatre, Film & Digital Production and in the Creative Writing for the Performing Arts MFA Program at UCR. Each fall, he also teaches the Producing the Screenplay class at USC’s Peter Stark MFA Producing Program.

He has been a story editor and writer on Spielberg’s Amazing Stories and the supervising producer on the ABC Television series Jack’s Place. Krieger co-wrote the Emmy award winning mini-series A Year in the Life and was nominated for a Humanitas Prize for co-writing the Disney Channel original movie, Going to the Mat. He also wrote ten original movies for the Disney Channel, including Zenon: Girl of the 21st Century and its two sequels, Tru Confessions, Smart House, Phantom of the Megaplex, and Cow Belles. He served as the head writer and story editor of the animated preschool series Toot & Puddle on Nickelodeon in 2008-2009.

His first full-length play, Chasing Smoke, debuted in a staged reading at Garry Marshall’s Falcon Theatre in Burbank in July 2014. His short film script Bad Timing was produced by the UCR Department of Theatre, Film & Digital Production in March, 2016. He is an Executive Producer of The Binding, a 2016 feature film written and directed by his son, Gus Krieger and also served as an Executive Producer of My Name is Myeisha, Gus’s second feature film which Gus co-wrote with UCR TFDP Professor Rickerby Hinds. Myeisha was shot entirely on location in Riverside in October 2016.

Watch his TEDx Talk, “Choose Joy.”

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S. Li S. Li

S. Li

S. Li

S. Li’s debut novel, Transoceanic Lights (HSE 2015), is a 2016 National Book Foundation ‘5 Under 35 Award’ Winner, Leapfrog Fiction Contest Semifinalist, Asheville Award Finalist, Willow Books Literature Award Finalist. He was born in Guangzhou, China in 1984 and moved to the US in 1989. He graduated with an A.B. in Biochemical Sciences from Harvard in 2006 and an M.D. from the University of Massachusetts in 2010. He is a neurologist living in the Boston area.

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Kunyang He Kunyang He

Kunyang He

Kunyang He

Kunyang He is a Chinese author writing in English. He has written two independent films and one documentary featuring the new generation of Chinese immigrants and international students in the States. He is also a translator and an English teacher, who takes teaching very seriously. The College of Corn is his first novel.

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Erika Raskin Erika Raskin

Erika Raskin

Erika Raskin

Erika Raskin’s debut novel, Close (Harvard Square Editions) is a gripping story about a modern family that a TV therapist tries to help. Her second novel, Best Intentions, is being published by St. Martin’s Press (August 15, 2017). The daughter of a novelist and human rights activist, she grew up in Washington, D.C. Her family lived in an old brick row house that was a hub of the anti-war and women’s movement. There was an endless soundtrack of Motown, classical music and politics. She’s been writing off and on since elementary school. (She still remembers  a short story she wrote in fourth grade that began: “Drip, drip, drip the faucet was leaking again. Or was it the rain?”)

Her fiction has been recognized by the Reynolds Price competition, Glimmertrain, and the Virginia Commission on the Arts. She’s been a Fellow at the Virginia Center for the Creative Arts. Her essays have appeared in print and on public radio. Her husband has been her boyfriend since she was 18. They have three children, two sons-in-law and many siblings, nieces and nephews. When they all get together they turn touch football, card games and ping-pong into blood sports.

Visit Erika’s website at www.erikaraskin.net – Author Twitter @ErikaRaskin

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Harriet Levin Millan Harriet Levin Millan

Harriet Levin Millan

Harriet Levin Millan

Harriet Levin Millan is a prize winning poet and writer. Her poetry collection, The Christmas Show, (Beacon Press) was selected for the Barnard New Women Poets Prize and The Poetry Society of America’s Alice Fay di Castagnola Award. She received a MFA from the University of Iowa’s Writers Workshop and has written for The Kenyon Review, Ploughshares, Prairie Schooner, The Harvard Review, The Iowa Review, PEN America, The Smart Set, among other publications. She and her family founded the Reunion Project and along with the participation of Philadelphia-area high school and college students, raised money to reunite several Lost Boys and Girls of Sudan with their mothers living abroad. She teaches creative writing in the English Department at Drexel University and directs the Certificate Program in Writing and Publishing. She lives with her husband outside Philadelphia.

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Kelvin Christopher James Kelvin Christopher James

Kelvin Christopher James

Kelvin Christopher James

Kelvin Christopher James is the recipient of a New York Foundation for the Arts Fellowship in Fiction and a National Endowment for the Arts Fellowship in Literature. He is the critically-acclaimed author of five novels: Secrets, a Novel (Villard & Vintage & KDP Indie), Fling with a Demon Lover (HarperCollins & KDP Indie), The Sorcerer’s Drum, Web of Freedom, Mooch, the Meek (KDP Indies), and short story collections Jumping Ship and Other Stories (Villard & KDP Indie), “City Lives”, “Crazy Loves”, “Backcountry Tales”, “A Fantastic Dozen”(KDP Indies). Kelvin is a US citizen living in New York.

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